What’s Your Action Plan?

Edwina Lee
Diamond Executive, Singapore

Edwina Lee, one of ASEA’s Diamond leaders in Singapore, built a Diamond ASEA business before the world shut down for a pandemic. No longer able to hold in-person meetings, Edwina and her team took action remotely. “As a team, everybody tried to do a little bit more,” she says, “and we ended up becoming even more efficient!”

Teaching an on-demand breakout session during ASEA’s Webvention, Edwina explained that building a business always involves taking action, and that means knowing how to turn a goal into a plan. From there, she’ll tell you to keep things going, and that momentum means accessing your bike-riding skills and taking a little lesson from Iron Man.

“I’m Going To Try” Is Not a Goal

“Do not say, ‘I’m going to try and see if I get to Diamond,’” Edwina advises. “That’s not a goal; it’s a wish. A goal is: ‘I’m going to enroll 20 people in six months to reach Bronze.’ That’s a goal. It’s actionable.”

So how do you turn that into an action plan? Start with the facts. “If you share ASEA with 10 people, only one will be interested,” Edwina says. “It’s a 10% success rate for most people. So if I want to enroll 20 people in six months, that means I have to talk to 200 people in six months.”

A Series of Actions

“Building your ASEA business is simply connecting with people, creating an interest, giving them an invitation, following up on their concerns, and collecting a decision,” Edwina explains. 

But it’s a process that takes persistence. 

“Sometimes people need up to 15 exposures,” Edwina says, “so if you’ve only talked to two or three people, you can’t give up. It’s a numbers game.”

Just Like Riding a Bike

Comparing business building to bicycle riding, Edwina points out that we can all get where we’re going faster and with less effort when riding a bike as opposed to walking. 

“But all of us know that when we first got on a bicycle, it felt unsteady. We had no experience,” she points out. “But by the fifth or sixth time we pedal, the bicycle has enough momentum to be balanced, and we are able to steer it. A new ASEA associate might be tempted to say, ‘My bike isn’t working. I can’t do it. I’m going to fall.’ But if you just keep doing it, you will succeed.”

Edwina acknowledges that when you start to “pedal” in your ASEA business, you’re not on flat ground; you’re at the foot of an upward slope. “It can be difficult,” she admits. “It’s double the stress and double the instability, so it needs double the effort.” 

It may take longer, but the same laws of physics will apply. “Once it moves enough, there will be momentum.”

Iron Man Always Comes Back 

There’s nothing unique about the pain of rejection. “All of us have experienced it,” Edwina says, adding that the only way to get off the emotional roller coaster is to either get out of the business or become like Iron Man.

“Iron Man is not bulletproof,” she explains. “Every time he tries to save the world, he gets busted up and nearly dies. He loses half his armor. But he comes back with a bigger and better version of himself, and off he goes again. The hero always comes back, right?” 

Her advice to anyone who feels discouraged is to take a day or two off if you need to, but come back. “Use it as a learning opportunity, not a sulking opportunity! Listen to a podcast or find some other way to sharpen your skills,” she says, “and then come back with bigger, better armor. Keep that light inside you shining, draw on the power within you, and one day, you will become bulletproof.”

This material is intended only for the US market. Results may vary. Refer to the income disclosure statement located at www.aseaglobal.com/opportunity. Unless otherwise noted, the person highlighted in this article are associated with ASEA and may have received compensation through the receipt of material goods or remuneration.